Sidekicks

Sidekicks / Let the Moment Happen

Designer: Mattheo Bandi

RCA

SIDEKICKS is a collection of fictional objects that aim to help us reduce the amount of phone usage. The objects are interventions in moments when smartphones are particularly distracting for us: a desk lamp for working, a speaker for leisure time, an alarm clock for the end of the day and a projector for watching a movie with someone. Rather than creating a new device or establishing a new behaviour to keep us away from the phone, the objects were re-designed with a particular feature: none of them has a switch on/off button; instead, they can only function whenever we physically leave our phones to them. 


More and more people everyday are willing to reduce the impact phones have on them, but it often turns out to be harder than expected. In this scenario, my goal is to reflect on the role interactive objects can play for and with us. The devices are, in fact, not only designed as tools to make us more productive or ease a process, but also as friendly companions to help us let the moment happen.

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WOSH

Designer Abbie: Fawcett 

University :UWE BRISTOL

Summary: AN INTUITIVE KITCHEN PRODUCT THAT TURNS WASTE FAT, OIL AND GREASE INTO NATURAL SOAP

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There is currently a huge problem surrounding the disposal of cooking oils, with a lack of alternatives, many people are disposing of them by pouring them down the drain. This leads to blockages in pipes, homes flooding and the notorious fatbergs that have formed in the sewers of London. The costly measures used to prevent and remedy the damage caused by these blockages are ultimately billed to the householder. 

 

WOSH is an easy to use soap making machine, with intuitive features and sleek design. Aiming to prevent waste cooking fat, oil and grease from being poured down the drain by presenting the user with an incentive to up-cycle it into a desirable and useful by-product, natural soap.

It’s a quick, safe and fun way of recycling domestic waste. The design is focused on integrating into the user’s routine, the quantities required for one bar of soap can be collected within around 2-3 weeks, the soap can be made in 15 minutes and with a 4 week cure time, this total of 6-7 weeks is roughly how long it will take to use up a bar of soap. 

The waste oils are filtered to remove any food particles and turned into soap using a tailored method of traditional, natural soap making. The recipes include natural additives such as essential oils, seeds and petals, acting as a natural exfoliant and giving the soap a quality scent, lather and texture. Making natural soap whilst reducing waste has never been more simple, collect waste cooking oils, create natural soap with WOSH.

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Crayola gets playful.

 

Crayola and Asos have joined forces to collaborate on an inspiring beauty collaboration.

Crayola Beauty has teamed up with Asos to create is a new vegan, a cruelty-free make up line aimed at 20-somethings.

The collection uses Crayolas playful heritage. The majority of the products come in a stick formula similar to brands like Nudestix, Milk Makeup, and Nars, who all stock easy-to-use chubby pencil-inspired cosmetics.

Among the products are:

95 total shades.
24 shades of stick foundation.
five palettes (three eye, one face, and one color changing lipstick).
cheek crayons.
mascaras.
makeup brushes.

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Hidden Senses

Sony's latest research project was exhibited at Milan 2018. Sony suggests a move away from our current phone dependency to a more poetic interaction which engage our senses.

Smart sensors gathered information from visitors’ actions to deliver a variety of awe-inspiring surprises. These included a virtual butterfly flying away as a vase was moved across the table, and a wall projection of a flower opening upon a person’s approach. 

Moving lights, changing surfaces, colourful wall projections and haptic feedback provided a glimpse of future interiors in which humans and furniture seamlessly and intuitively interact.

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